In a 6-3 decision, the Supreme Court of the United States held that Aereo “performs” the copyrighted works “publicly” as those terms are defined by the Copyright Act, thus infringing the copyrights of the content owners.

In a unanimous opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that all claims at issue in the highly anticipated case of Alice Corp. v. CLS Bank Int'l. are invalid under §101 of the patent statutes.

In a 2-1 landmark decision, the United States Patent and Trademark Office cancelled six (6) "WASHINGTON REDSKINS" federal trademark registrations finding that the name “Redskins” is “disparaging to Native Americans” at the respective times they were registered, in violation of Section 2(a) of the Trademark Act.

Friday, 23 May 2014 19:45

Chief Judge Rader Stepping Down

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Chief Judge Randall Rader announced that he will be stepping down from his position as chief judge of the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, effective May 30, 2014. Judge Sharon Prost will succeed Judge Rader as chief judge. Judge Rader, who leaves the position with three years remaining in his seven-year term as chief judge, will remain in active service to the Court.

Friday, 16 May 2014 20:42

API is Subject of Copyright, Says Fed. Cir.

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The Federal Circuit held recently that an application programming interface (“API”) may fall within the scope of copyright protection despite its functionality.

Oracle v. Google primarily concerned Google’s copying of the “structure, sequence and organization” of numerous API packages of Oracle’s Java software package.

Effective June 2, 2014, the United States Patent and Trademark Office will commence a six-month Glossary Pilot Program to promote clarity in patent claims, particularly for software-related inventions (falling under technologies examined by USPTO Technology Centers 2100, 2400, 2600, and 3600/Business Methods).  Possible benefits of the program could include quicker and more consistent examination, with hopes for higher quality patent claims.  Possible concerns about the initiative might include a potential for inadvertent over-narrowing of certain defined terms.

The program requires an applicant to include a glossary section in the patent application specification to define terms used in the patent claims.  Applications accepted into the pilot program will receive expedited processing and be placed on an examiner’s special docket prior to the first office action.

The March 27, 2014 Federal Register details for the Glossary Pilot Program can be found here.

A link to the USPTO press release about the program is provided here.

On March 4, 2014, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office published a guidance memorandum entitled "Guidance For Determining Subject Matter Eligibility Of Claims Reciting Or Involving Laws of Nature, Natural Phenomena, & Natural Products."  The guidance provides a new examination procedure for evaluating subject matter eligibility of certain types of patent applications under 35 U.S.C. § 101 in view of two fairly recent Supreme Court decisions, namely, Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc. and Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Laboratories, Inc.  The official USPTO press release can be found here.

 

 

 

Thursday, 13 February 2014 20:10

LOVE Provides Bittersweet Cautionary Tale

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By most accounts, Robert Indiana is ambivalent about his career as an artist. Perhaps his most famous work is LOVE, the iconic motif consisting of the letters L and O stacked atop V and E.  All success aside, the proliferation of unauthorized copies emblazoned on countless trinkets and souvenirs made Indiana appear overexposed and commercialized relative to his Pop Art peers, according to at least one New York Times article. Indiana was unable to stop the swell of knock-offs because the work was not properly copyrighted. Today, Indiana feels that it prevented him from gaining critical recognition as an artist.

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