The United States Patent and Trademark Office (“USPTO”) is in quest to deliberate on issues concerning protections from disclosure for communications between patent applicants and their patent advisors.  More specifically, the USPTO is commencing a discussion on whether and to what extent the U.S. Courts should recognize privilege for communications between U.S. patent practitioners and their clients in foreign jurisdictions; U.S. applicants and their "non-attorney" U.S. patent agents; and between foreign patent practitioners and their clients.

The Supreme Court of the United States (“SCOTUS”) has unequivocally addressed the current standard of review for patent claim construction. Accordingly, the Court has held that a Federal Appellate Court can only overturn a District Court’s factual findings, if those findings were determined to be clearly erroneous. As such, this new standard transforms the de novo standard used by the Federal Circuit when reviewing patent claim construction.

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has declared that copyrighted materials are crucial to the Patent System and should not be threatened as copyright infringement. These remarks come in at an opportune time as the USPTO sought to intervene in a copyright infringement suit against Defendant McDonnell Boehnen Hubert & Berghoff LLP, whose patent prosecution attorneys have been sued by Plaintiff Publishers for using their copyrighted material in  patent applications.

Hormel Foods Corporation ("Hormel") has been sued by Unitherm Food Systems, Inc. (“Unitherm”) for misappropriating trade secrets relating to the method of pre-cooking sliced bacon. The suit has been filed in a Minnesota Federal Court in front of the presiding U.S. District Judge Paul Magnuson.  Unitherm is a manufacturer of machines used for producing food products, while Hormel  is a producer of lunch meats.

Stephen Kimble is an inventor of a web-shooting gadget that allows kids to imagine they have super powers like Spiderman. More particularly, Kimble was granted a patent in 1991 by the United States Patent and Trademark Office for an apparatus that shoots foam from the palm of the hand, to give the user an impression that a spider web is formed. As such, the Supreme Court of the United States (“SCOTUS”) has agreed to review an appeal by Kimble in regards to considering overruling a 50-year old precedent that bars the collection of royalties on patents after they expire.

Wednesday, 28 January 2015 23:02

The number "12" Mark

Written by

The Seattle Seahawks, a National Football Team is scheduled to play the New England Patriots in this year’s much anticipated Super Bowl matchup. As many football fans might be aware, the Seahawks gained attention from everyone for winning last year’s Super Bowl, complimented by their stingy secondary defense. However, the Seahawks also gained attention from everyone in the media for another reason: dubbing their home fans as “the 12th man.”

The USPTO today issued an updated and comprehensive guideline regarding patent subject matter eligibility in view of the recent Supreme Court decisions in Alice CorpMyriad, and Mayo.  This "2014 Interim Guidance on Patent Subject Matter Eligibility" was published today, December 16, 2014.  

The Supreme Court today granted certiorari in a case asking whether its prior decision in Brulotte v. Thys Co., 379 U.S. 29 (1964) should be overruled, which previously held that a licensee's obligations are absolved after the expiration of a patent, and that royalty payments for a patent cannot continue beyond the life of that patent.  

Page 1 of 15